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Interest of Canadians in Internet Voting (2004, 2006, 2008 and 2011) – Research Note

Electors' Opinions Concerning Principle of Internet Voting

For the 2011 election, Elections Canada added a question on the principle of Internet voting to the Canadian Election Study, to obtain electors' opinions in this regard. As may be seen in Graph 12, 50% of Canadian electors agree with the principle of Internet voting, while 40% disagree and 11% do not know.Footnote 14

Graph 12: Electors' Opinions Concerning the Principle of Internet Voting (2011)
(% of respondents agreeing with the principle that Canadians should be able to vote over the Internet)

Graph 12: Electors' Opinions Concerning the Principle of Internet Voting (2011)
Text version of "Graph 12: Electors' Opinions Concerning the Principle of Internet Voting (2011)"

With respect to the socio-demographic variables, Graph 13 shows little fluctuation in respondent opinion concerning the principle of Internet voting, regardless of the variables used for the analysis.Footnote 15 In fact, we note that the highest percentage is 58% (35– to 64-year-olds, university graduates and unemployed individuals), three percentage points above the national average (55%),Footnote 16 and the lowest percentage is 49% (the 65+ age group).

Overall, none of the socio-demographic variables used to analyze elector opinion concerning the principle of Internet voting proved statistically significant (p < 0.05). In other words, for the 2011 survey, Canadians' opinions concerning the principle of Internet voting reveal no significant differences based on age group, education level or employment status.

Graph 13: Principle of Internet Voting by Socio-Demographic Variable (2011)
(% of respondents agreeing with the principle that Canadians should be able to vote over the Internet)


Graph 13: Principle of Internet Voting by Socio-Demographic Variable (2011)

Text version of "Graph 13: Principle of Internet Voting by Socio-Demographic Variable (2011)"

Age Group 2011 (CES) Education 2011 (CES) Employment Status 2011 (CES)
Χ2 = 5.56 (p = 0.062)
γ = – 0.11
Χ2 = 1.73 (p = 0.422)
γ = 0.07
Χ2 = 0.97 (p = 0.615)
Cramer's V = 0.03

Footnote 14 Rounding out of decimals brings the total percentage to 101.

Footnote 15 Response categories were recoded using a dichotomous nominal scale (Disagree/Agree).

Footnote 16 The "Not sure" category was excluded, which explains the difference in the general population percentage between graphs 12 and 13 (50% vs. 55%).