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2013–14 Departmental Performance Report

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: An Accessible Electoral Framework that Canadians Trust and Use

Most of Elections Canada's programs deliver results to Canadians during a general election, and the measurement of these results can be found in reports published after each general election. A number of performance indicators are measured through surveys with electors, candidates and election officers. These reports are available online.Footnote 9

In a reporting year during which no general election takes place, Elections Canada uses by-elections to report on results. However, there are important considerations to take into account:

Program 1.1: Electoral Operations

Description

This program allows Elections Canada to deliver fair and efficient electoral events whenever they may be required so that Canadians are able to exercise their democratic right to vote in a federal general election, by-election or referendum. To this end, the agency provides an accessible and constantly improved electoral process that is responsive to the needs of electors.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013–14
Main Estimates
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013–14
Actual Spending (Authorities Used)
2013–14
Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
36,641,312 36,641,312 45,900,589 45,326,885 8,685,573*

*The difference of $8.7 million between actual spending ($45.3 million) and planned spending ($36.6 million) for 2013–14 is mainly a result of the conduct of the 2013 by-elections and readiness activities for the 2015 general election, including the implementation of the new electoral boundaries.


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013–14
Planned
2013–14
Actual
2013–14
Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
202 212 10


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators* Actual Results
The electoral process is administrated fairly and efficiently. Cost of elections per elector The total estimated cost of all five by-elections held in 2013 is approximately $3.8 million. This represents approximately $12.86 per registered elector.

The average cost of the previous 11 by-elections (2009 to 2012) was $10.02 per registered elector. Differences are largely attributable to variations in location, geographical size and population of electoral districts.
Percentage of Canadians who believe that Elections Canada administers elections in a fair manner In the public opinion surveys conducted following the 2013 by-elections, an average of 80% of respondents said that Elections Canada ran the by-elections somewhat or very fairly: 91% in Labrador, 83% in Brandon–Souris, 82% in Provencher, 81% in Bourassa and 74% in Toronto Centre.

It should be noted that between 7% and 21% of respondents did not know or did not have an opinion: 7% in Labrador, 15% in Bourassa and Brandon–Souris, 16% in Provencher and 21% in Toronto Centre.
Elections Canada is prepared to hold electoral events whenever they are called. Percentage of electoral offices that are fully functional within seven days of the start of an electoral event In the five by-elections held in 2013, 100% of the offices were fully functioning within seven days of the start of the election period, meeting all operational targets.
Canadians have opportunities to exercise their democratic right to vote. Percentage of electors who report not voting for administrative reasons In the public opinion surveys conducted following the 2013 by-elections, the proportion of non-voters who reported administrative or electoral process issues as a reason for not voting was 18% in Toronto Centre, 12% in Labrador, 10% in Brandon–Souris, 9% in Provencher and 7% in Bourassa.
Percentage of polls that open on time During the 2013 by-elections, a total of 957 polls (69 advance polls, 861 ordinary polls and 27 mobile polls) were established by the returning officers.

All polls opened on time in Bourassa, Labrador and Toronto Centre. Two polls –– in Brandon–Souris and Provencher, respectively –– opened late, but no electors were kept waiting during the delay as none had arrived.

Thus for all of the 2013 by-elections, and consistent with previous by-elections, over 99% of the polls opened on time.
Percentage of electors who are satisfied with their experience of casting a ballot According to public opinion surveys conducted following the 2013 by-elections, almost all voters:
  • found it very easy or somewhat easy to vote: 97% in both Brandon–Souris and Provencher, 96% in Labrador, 95% in Bourassa and 90% in Toronto Centre
  • found the polling station to be at a convenient distance from their home: 99% in Provencher, 98% in Toronto Centre, 97% in Bourassa, and 96% in both Brandon–Souris and Labrador
  • were satisfied with wait times: 99% in both Brandon–Souris and Provencher, 98% in Labrador, 97% in Toronto Centre and 95% in Bourassa
Canadians have the information and support they need to participate in elections. Percentage of Canadians who are aware of the variety of voting methods available In the public opinion surveys conducted following the 2013 by-elections, an average of 41% of all respondents reported being aware that they could vote by mail at any time during the by-election: 45% in Provencher, 44% in both Brandon–Souris and Labrador, 37% in Toronto Centre and 28% in Bourassa.
Percentage of Canadians who know how and where to vote A large majority of voters reported being aware of the by-election taking place in their electoral district: 100% in Labrador, 99% in Brandon–Souris, 92% in Provencher, and 91% in both Bourassa and Toronto Centre.

A majority of electors recalled receiving their VIC: 91% in Bourassa, 90% in Brandon–Souris, 87% in Labrador, 85% in Provencher and 80% in Toronto Centre.

Those who cited the VIC as the primary source of information on when and where to vote amounted to 50% in Labrador, 19% in Toronto Centre, 18% in Provencher, 14% in Bourassa and 12% in Brandon–Souris.
Canadians are provided with timely electoral results that accurately reflect the choices they have made. Percentage of polls reporting preliminary results after they close In all five by-elections held in 2013, 100% of polls reported preliminary results after they closed, meeting all operational targets.
Variance between preliminary results and validated results Variances between preliminary results and validated results for by-elections held in 2013 were as follows:
  • 0.009% in Provencher
  • 0.016% in Bourassa
  • 0.029% in Brandon–Souris
  • 0.082% in Labrador
  • 0.433% in Toronto Centre
Variance between reported results and results after judicial recounts No recounts were requested further to the by-elections conducted in 2013.
Independent electoral commissions have the capacity to carry out their obligations under the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act. Percentage of commissioners who are satisfied with the services and support they received from Elections Canada In the post-mortem survey of commission members following the redistribution process, satisfaction levels for the various types of services and support were as follows:
  • linguistic and publication services, 89%
  • financial services, 86%
  • operations support, 86%
  • geographic support and maps, 84%
  • technical support, 77%
  • office set-up, 68%
  • office dismantling, 67%
  • technical equipment, 55%
For the most part, the lower satisfaction for technical equipment was explained by problems with cellular coverage and Internet access in some areas of the country, and by office equipment, such as printer/fax devices, not meeting the required demand.

*Targets for these performance indicators are under development.


Performance Analysis

Implement New Electoral Boundaries – Operational Component

Elections Canada continued to enable the electoral boundaries readjustment process by providing the 10 independent commissions with professional, financial and administrative support services. The representation order describing and naming Canada's new 338 electoral districts was proclaimed in October 2013. Elections Canada completed the readjustment process under budget and was ready to implement the new boundaries within seven months after the proclamation of the representation order, as prescribed by the legislation.

In 2013–14, Elections Canada also:

The new electoral map, which reflects demographic changes in Canada over the last decade, is ready to use for the 2015 general election.

Improve Compliance with Voting Day Procedures

Following reports of administrative irregularities in the electoral district of Etobicoke Centre (Ontario) during the May 2011 general election, Elections Canada initiated an independent review of compliance with voting day procedures. It reported to Parliament in April 2013 on the findings and on the resulting Compliance Action Plan. In 2013–14, the agency began implementing the action plan for the 2015 general election and beyond. The plan contains initiatives to improve voting operations, enhance election officer training and modernize voter registration.

a) Improve Voting Operations

A major component of the action plan was a pilot project aimed at testing a more streamlined way to manage and carry out voting operations at both advance and ordinary polls. This project intended to leverage technology to offer more consistent and efficient services to voters, while also improving working conditions and simplifying training for election officers. However, because of emerging priorities related to Bill C-23, Elections Canada decided to postpone the project. Instead, the agency invested efforts into developing and implementing new administrative mechanisms, under existing authorities, to reduce the administrative burden placed on election officers and voters alike.

However, given the multiple factors at play, including the complexity of the voting process, the limited time available to recruit and train election officers, and the absence of technology at the polls, meaningful progress on improving compliance and reducing errors will be limited without enabling legislative changes.

b) Enhance Election Officer Training

In 2013–14, Elections Canada reviewed the election officer training program and developed a new training plan to improve efficiency and ensure better compliance with standards and procedures. The new training plan:

The agency also engaged key stakeholders and continued to work with provincial and territorial electoral management bodies to develop standard approaches and share best practices for recruiting and training election officers.

These initiatives will enhance election officer training for the 2015 general election and contribute to improving services to electors.

Modernize Voter Registration

With the introduction of online registration in 2012, most voter registration services will be offered online during the 2015 general election. This will permit address changes to existing elector records, as well as the addition of new records when Elections Canada already has partial information on a qualified elector.

In 2013–14, Elections Canada developed a new computer application that will give authorized election officers access to a secure and centralized voter database over the Internet at all local Elections Canada offices across Canada.

Renew Public Enquiries Services

In 2013–14, work advanced to modernize and improve public enquiries services for the 2015 general election. The business requirements and procurement activities were completed, and implementation of the new system was well underway.

Extend Use of the Voter Information Card

As a result of new provisions in Bill C-23, Elections Canada cancelled its activities aimed at allowing electors to use their VIC as proof of address for the 2015 general election.

Develop the Electoral Reminder Program

In 2013–14, the agency developed a strategic communications plan for the Electoral Reminder Program. It aims to streamline and simplify messaging about where, when and how to register and vote, especially for those who may find it difficult to find this information.

Work began on developing a multi-phase, multimedia communications campaign to provide messaging to voters at key and relevant points before and during the election period.

Continue to Improve Accessibility of Programs and Processes

Elections Canada delivered training to communications staff and those responsible for developing field outreach programming to raise awareness of accessibility principles and practices in the workplace. Staff will be able to incorporate these principles into the design of electoral programs and services. The agency also established the Advisory Group on Disability Issues in February 2014. The group provided advice on the agency's plans for improving the accessibility of voting and information services for the 2015 general election.

Conduct Voter Registration Drives Prior to the Next Election

Certain groups of electors, such as youth, are registered in smaller numbers than others. To address this issue, Elections Canada considered on-site targeted revision on campuses, but a cost-benefit analysis conducted in 2013–14 did not support the continuation of the project. Instead, the agency will focus its investments on the promotion of pre-event online registration among recent movers and young electors. Elections Canada will reach out to first-time voters through a combination of targeted revision and advertising, as well as personalized letters promoting the new online voter registration services.

Expand Voting by Special Ballot

For the 2015 general election, Elections Canada will offer the opportunity to vote by special ballot at selected post-secondary institutions, Aboriginal Friendship Centres and youth centres. Consultations held with returning officers and organizations serving groups of electors known for their lower voter turnout fed into the site selection and the design of a policy framework for returning officers.

Delivering By-elections

Elections Canada successfully delivered by-elections on May 13, 2013, in Labrador and on November 25, 2013, in Bourassa, Brandon–Souris, Provencher and Toronto Centre. The Chief Electoral Officer's consolidated report on the conduct of these by-elections was submitted to Parliament and posted on Elections Canada's website.Footnote 10

Program 1.2: Regulation of Electoral Activities

Description

This program provides Canadians with an electoral process that is fair, transparent and in compliance with the Canada Elections Act. Within this program, Elections Canada is responsible for administering the political financing provisions of the Act. This includes monitoring compliance, disclosing and reporting financial activities and enforcing electoral legislation.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013–14
Main Estimates
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013–14
Actual Spending (Authorities Used)
2013–14
Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
28,072,002 28,072,002 28,595,985 27,960,704 (111,298)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013–14
Planned
2013–14
Actual
2013–14
Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
76 75 (1)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators* Actual Results
Canadians have confidence in the fairness of the administration and enforcement of the electoral legislation. Percentage of Canadians reporting confidence in the fairness of Elections Canada's regulatory activities This indicator is being reviewed.
Political entities are transparent in their use of financial resources. Percentage of financial returns that are submitted within four months of election day In the 2013 by-elections, 97% of candidates' returns were submitted on time (28 out of 29).
Number of substantive corrections and amendments required to returns In the 2013 by-elections, no substantive corrections or amendments to the candidates' returns were required.
Political entities understand and comply with their obligations and responsibilities under Canada's electoral legislation. Percentage of candidates who understand their obligations and responsibilities regarding contribution limits, as established by the Canada Elections Act This indicator is being reviewed.
Number of cases of non-compliance that are subject to compliance measures The horizontal audit of contributions made in 2011, which was completed in 2013–14, identified 196 individuals who potentially accepted contributions in excess of the limit. As of March 31, 2014, 90% of the files were closed with the return of contributions and 9% were still pending. In the 1% of cases where individuals did not respond, the files were referred to the Commissioner of Canada Elections.

*Targets for these performance indicators are under development.

Performance Analysis

Implement the New Electoral Boundaries – Regulatory Component

In 2013–14, Elections Canada assisted political entities with the transition to the new electoral boundaries. The agency published useful information, such as the fact sheet entitled "Information on the Effect of the New Representation Order on Registered Associations." Technical sessions were held with political parties in January and February 2014.

Letters regarding the transition were sent to all existing registered electoral district associations soon after the proclamation of the new representation order. As of March 31, 2014, Elections Canada had pre-registered 692 of 1,192 electoral district associations (58%).

Improve Reporting on Political Financing

The first annual political financing report was drafted in 2013–14. However, in light of emerging priorities, including Bill C-23 activities, publication of the report was postponed to the next fiscal year. The report will be updated with new information and trends.

Conduct a Horizontal Audit of 2011 Contributions

In 2013–14, Elections Canada completed the horizontal audit of contributions made in 2011 to nomination contestants, registered associations and candidates. The agency sent letters to those who were found to have accepted contributions over the limit, requesting them to pay the excess back to the contributor or to the Receiver General for Canada, in compliance with the Act.

As of March 31, 2014, 90% of the files were closed with the return of contributions and 9% were still pending. In the 1% of cases where individuals did not respond, the files were referred to the Commissioner of Canada Elections.

Continue to Improve Stakeholder Information

In 2013–14, Elections Canada completed a review of information and tools to ensure that they are presented in a consistent, easy-to-access and easily understandable format. As part of this initiative, the agency revised and published handbooks for nomination contestants, electoral district associations and registered parties. The development of new tutorials was suspended pending changes resulting from Bill C-23.

Electoral Integrity Project Coordination Office

In December 2013, Elections Canada established the Electoral Integrity Project Coordination Office to develop and implement a quality assurance and compliance strategy for the 2015 general election. Applying integrated risk methodology, this unit identifies threats to electoral integrity and develops appropriate controls. It collates and analyses data from a variety of internal and external sources to enhance the agency's ability to prevent, detect and respond to concerns. It will also be responsible for implementing the independent audit requirements under Bill C-23.

Office of the Commissioner of Canada Elections

As of April 1, 2013, there were 350 open files with the Office of the Commissioner regarding potential offences under the legislation. These were opened based on complaints from the public or political entities as well as on referrals from within Elections Canada. Between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014, the Office of the Commissioner recorded an additional 113 complaints from the public and political entities as well as 322 referrals from within Elections Canada. In addition, the Commissioner opened one file of his own initiative.

The Commissioner filed charges against five individuals in four different files, signed eight compliance agreements, resolved 55 files with a caution letter and resolved several others through informal means. A number of other files were closed, mainly for one of these reasons: the alleged offence was not within the Commissioner's jurisdiction, the allegations did not amount to an offence under the Act, there was insufficient evidence to proceed further, or the matter was trivial. On March 31, 2014, 350 files remained open (the same number as at the beginning of the fiscal year).

Some files of particular significant were among those concluded in 2013–14. This included two separate investigations regarding deceptive communications during the 2011 general election.

The first investigation related to misleading automated telephone calls in the electoral district of Guelph (Ontario). On April 2, 2013, pursuant to a decision by the Director of Public Prosecutions, the Office of the Commissioner laid a charge against one individual for having wilfully prevented or endeavoured to prevent an elector from voting during the 2011 general election.

The second investigation related to other allegations of nuisance calls and calls providing incorrect poll locations. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether there was enough evidence to believe, based on reasonable grounds, that one or more persons committed an offence or offences under the Act. The conclusions of this investigation were made public in April 2014.Footnote 11

Another matter of significance related to unpaid leadership loans and claims. In July 2013, after extensive consultations with the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, the Commissioner announced his conclusion that the Canada Elections Act lacked sufficient clarity to support enforcement action in the criminal courts with respect to loans or claims that remained unpaid following the expiry of an extension. As a result, no enforcement action could be taken against the leadership contestants in relation to their unpaid debts.

With the goal of providing greater transparency, the Commissioner published his first annual report in October 2013 to provide a more comprehensive overview of the resources and activities of the Commissioner in 2012–13, as well as some of the key challenges facing his office. In addition, the Commissioner's website was enhanced to better communicate with Canadians.

In February 2014, Bill C-23 was tabled in the House of Commons. This bill, which received royal assent on June 19, 2014, contains a number of provisions affecting the Commissioner, including the move of his office from Elections Canada to the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions.

Program 1.3: Electoral Engagement

Description

This program promotes and sustains the Canadian electoral process. It provides Canadians with electoral education and information programs so that they can make informed decisions about their engagement in the electoral process. The program also aims to improve the electoral framework by consulting and sharing electoral practices with other stakeholders.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013–14
Main Estimates
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013–14
Actual Spending (Authorities Used)
2013–14
Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
8,939,136 8,939,136 8,142,702 7,974,120 (965,016)


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013–14
Planned
2013–14
Actual
2013–14
Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
65 57 (8)


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators* Actual Results
Canadians make informed decisions about their engagement in the electoral process. Percentage of Canadians who believe that they can make an informed decision about their engagement This indicator is being reviewed.
Canadians understand the importance of voting and the value of participating in the electoral process. Percentage of Canadians who understand the importance of voting In the public opinion surveys conducted following the 2013 by-elections, between 38% and 65% of respondents who said they voted invoked a sense of civic duty for doing so:
  • 65% in Bourassa
  • 55% in Toronto Centre
  • 43% in Brandon–Souris
  • 39% in Provencher
  • 38% in Labrador
Percentage of Canadians who understand the value of participating in the electoral process This indicator is being reviewed.
Elections Canada and international electoral stakeholders improve their capacity to better administer the electoral process. Percentage of international and domestic stakeholders who intend to incorporate shared best practices This indicator is being reviewed.
Parliamentarians have access to evidence-based information, allowing them to make informed decisions about existing and emerging electoral issues. Percentage of parliamentarians satisfied with the quality of the Chief Electoral Officer's recommendations reports This indicator is being reviewed.

*Targets for these performance indicators are under development.

Performance Analysis

Conduct Research

In 2013–14, Elections Canada undertook various research projects to support its three-year business plan and ongoing programs. The results supported the agency's development and implementation of key initiatives, and strengthened its knowledge on key electoral issues.

An overview of best practices for compliance in both Canada and other countries was conducted as part of the comprehensive review of voting procedures at polling sites. This comparative study assisted the agency in refining its programs to ensure better compliance in future elections.

Two research studies on Internet voting were finalized and published in early fall 2013. They will assist the agency in refining future plans to improve services to electors:

Comparative assessments and consultations were also conducted to support the review of the voter identification policy, aimed at enhancing services to electors. However, this project was suspended with the introduction of Bill C-23, which proposed several changes to the voter identification regime.

Promote Civic Education Programming

Elections Canada's civic education programming aims to improve knowledge and understanding of democracy and the electoral process among students at the elementary and secondary levels.

The agency promoted the program among teachers through advertisements in print and online education sector publications, promotional brochures, e-bulletins to educators and education professionals, and resource booths at education conferences across Canada. The survey of educators who ordered Elections Canada's civic education resources indicated that 90% were satisfied with the materials.

The agency also promoted civic education through the distribution of educational material on flash drives, simulation kits and a range of other resources directed at youth.

In September 2013, Elections Canada successfully held another Canada's Democracy Week,Footnote 14 which involved a total of 45 organizations as partners and supporters of the initiative. Close to 600 Canadian youth attended the various events. The agency also ran the National Democracy Challenge.Footnote 15

Elections Canada increased its social media presence on three online platforms (Twitter, Facebook and YouTube) as well as its outreach to provincial and territorial departments of education and electoral management bodies.

Preparatory work continued for delivering the student parallel election program during the 2015 general election.Footnote 16

Improve Youth Engagement

In 2013–14, Elections Canada completed preparatory work to be ready to launch a new knowledge-sharing project in April 2014, called Inspire Democracy: Knowledge for Civic Action. The purpose of this project, which comprises a new websiteFootnote 17 and workshop series, is to help youth-serving organizations better understand the issue of declining electoral participation and to equip them with resources to improve the electoral participation of youth. Resources include Elections Canada's information on how, when and where to register and vote in the 2015 general election.

Several studies were completed in support of this project and will be shared in the research section of the Inspire Democracy website as they become available. They include:

In addition, the agency completed a pilot project with the Native Women's Association of Canada to develop and test a new civic community guide for young Aboriginal electors.

Elections Canada also launched two new knowledge development initiatives:

Provide Support to Parliamentarians

In 2013–14, Elections Canada provided information to parliamentarians regarding compliance with registration and voting procedures at the polls, and on ways to prevent fraudulent communications with electors. This included the publication, in spring 2013, of two reports regarding incidents that occurred during the 2011 general election:

In addition, the Chief Electoral Officer provided technical briefings to parliamentarians regarding Bill C-23. He also appeared before the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs regarding Bill C-520, An Act supporting non-partisan agents of Parliament, and on a question of privilege related to Elections Canada and the Member of Parliament for Selkirk–Interlake.

Elections Canada shared information and consulted throughout the year with political parties through the Advisory Committee of Political Parties, whose membership comprises the 17 registered parties. This included a two-day annual general meeting in June 2013 and a workshop with technical experts in November 2013.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups include management and oversight services, communications services, legal services, human resources management services, financial management services, information management services, information technology services, real property services, materiel services, acquisition services and other administrative services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2013–14
Main Estimates
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2013–14
Actual Spending (Authorities Used)
2013–14
Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
42,201,667 42,201,667 39,269,365 38,966,040 (3,235,627)*


*The difference in expenditures of $3.2 million between actual spending ($39.0 million) and planned spending ($42.2 million) for 2013–14 is mainly a result of lower than expected rent in the new building in Gatineau.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2013–14
Planned
2013–14
Actual
2013–14
Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
145 129 (16)


Performance Analysis

Complete the Office Consolidation and Relocation Project

The consolidation and relocation of the agency's offices to Victoria Street in Gatineau was successfully completed under budget in late fall 2013.

Ensure Compliance of the Website with Federal Accessibility Standards

Elections Canada met the deadline of July 13, 2013, set out by central agencies to implement the last phase of requirements defined in the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0. All new documents and applications are now produced in compliance with these accessibility standards.

Strengthen Management Framework

As part of Elections Canada's ongoing commitment to modernize and strengthen our management framework, the focus remained on the following key internal controls:

Prepare the Next Risk-Based Audit Plan

A risk-based audit plan was prepared following the Internal Auditing Standards for the Government of Canada and the International Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing of the Institute of Internal Auditors.

Implement Workforce Adjustment Measures

In 2013–14, Elections Canada met the provisions of the Work Force Adjustment Directive, which resulted in the elimination of 32 encumbered indeterminate positions. Workforce adjustment measures were facilitated through regular communications with all employees as well as training and continuous support to affected employees.

Develop a Change Management Approach

As part of its change management strategy, the agency developed a full set of guidelines and tools for the office consolidation project that can also be applied to other priorities. Change management activities included training, needs analysis consultations, a transition plan and a communications plan. With regard to the new Directive on Performance Management, change management activities included training on the directive for employees and managers, and a communications plan. The Change Management Committee was created to work in collaboration with the consolidation team and the Corporate Strategy Office.

Strengthen Information Management

In keeping with direction from central agencies, Elections Canada continued to strengthen its information management program by testing an electronic document management system (GCDocs) through a pilot project.

Continue to Strengthen Information Technology

Work continued to keep Elections Canada's IT infrastructure current, to maintain agency-specific systems and develop new ones, and to ensure efficient telecommunications services. The new application to support modernized field voter registration was on track, with all essential system elements developed in the reporting year. A new online training component was also tested as part of the returning officer recruitment program. A new contract to supply local offices with IT equipment during the 2015 general election was developed and ready for spring release. Elections Canada continued to enhance the telecommunications environment for externally hosted event systems.

Explore Shared Services and Collaborative Service Arrangements

With the office relocation to Gatineau, Elections Canada identified and implemented efficiencies in collaboration with the other agents of Parliament in the building. These resulted in:

Use the Corporate Strategy Office to Support and Oversee Improvement Initiatives

The Corporate Strategy Office continued to fulfill its reporting functions, while supporting and strengthening project management practices across the organization. The Corporate Strategy Committee continued to monitor project health on a monthly basis, including detailed financial forecasts and expenditures, and it reported regularly to senior management.