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2015–16 Departmental Performance Report

Section III: Analysis of Program(s) and Internal Services

Programs

Program 1.1: Electoral Operations

Description

This program allows Elections Canada to deliver fair and efficient electoral events whenever they may be required so that Canadians are able to exercise their democratic right to vote during a federal general election, by-election or referendum by providing an accessible and constantly improved electoral process responsive to the needs of electors.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Maintain Readiness and Implement Administrative Improvements

Improve Quality Controls

To minimize procedural and record-keeping errors at the polls, Elections Canada introduced enhanced recruitment practices, modernized training and, where possible, simplified procedures and clarified instructions for poll workers. It also hired central poll supervisors and registration officers in greater numbers to enhance monitoring and minimize errors.

According to a post-election survey, 96% of election workers felt well prepared to undertake their tasks during the 42nd general election. This is a notable increase compared to the 41st general election; the majority of returning officers believed that the training of poll workers improved procedural compliance.

Modernize Voter Registration

For the first time in a general election, Elections Canada provided an online voter registration service and promoted it throughout the election. More than 1.7 million electors used the service. Online transactions accounted for 37% of all voters list updates during the revision period, including 107,000 new registrations. Information obtained through the online registration service was added to a new secure national database that can be accessed and updated in real time by returning officers.

These initiatives contributed to improving the accuracy of the preliminary lists of electors and helped reduce the number of manual, paper-based registrations taking place in-person on election day–a known source of procedural and record-keeping errors in the 41st general election. In 2015, 5.8% of electors who voted registered on election day, down from 6.2% in 2011.

Enhance Accessibility

Working with the disability community, Elections Canada set 35 accessibility criteria for polling places. The majority of locations (96%) met all 15 mandatory accessibility criteria. Information on the accessibility of polling locations was made available to the public on both the voter information card and Elections Canada's website.

The agency offered registration and voting information in accessible formats and made changes to staffing and training design to assist electors and reduce barriers to voting for electors with disabilities. It also assigned new accessibility officers to local offices and polling locations and provided Braille lists of candidates and magnifiers at polling stations. As a further step, election workers were positioned at the doors to the polling stations to open them for all visitors.

An accessibility feedback form, available online and at polling locations and local offices, allowed electors to report challenges they encountered or to file complaints regarding poll site accessibility. The majority of electors with a disability who were surveyed post-election indicated that election staff was sensitive to their needs when voting and 99% did not report any accessibility problems. While this figure is an improvement over 2011 (when it was 96%), there remain instances of electors facing accessibility barriers. Other survey and evaluation results showed that the accessibility of information and of polling locations could be improved.

Implement the Voter Identification Policy

Elections Canada introduced a revised voter ID policy that more clearly explains the procedures, lists authorized ID documents and provides guidance to ensure the consistent application of requirements. The agency authorized new pieces of voter identification, including electronic statements, invoices and ID issued by First Nations bands, Métis organizations and Inuit local authorities. The vast majority (99%) of voters said they had the required identification documents with them when they went to vote. The result for this measure was the same in 2011, and was 98% in 2008.

Expand Opportunities for Voting

Pursuant to recent legislative changes, Elections Canada conducted an additional day of advance polling, bringing the total to four days. It set up 240 more advance polls than it did for the 41st general election (a 5% increase), at 4,946 advance polling locations. More than 3.6 million electors cast their votes at advance polls, representing a 74% increase over the 41st general election.

Among the agency's 148 satellite offices, 71 were located on campuses, at YMCAs, and in Friendship Centres. These offices provided registration and voting services, making it easier for students, youth and Aboriginal electors to vote. More than 70,000 electors voted at these satellite offices, with campus locations having the highest voter turnout.

For the first time, the agency also provided on-demand special ballot voting service at 97 acute care hospitals. The feedback on the new model was positive. A total of 22,000 electors in 764 acute care hospitals voted by special ballot, compared to 21,000 electors in 759 acute care hospitals in 2011.

Improve Contact Centre Services

For the 42nd general election, Elections Canada introduced a dedicated website to offer information and quick reference to the public. The agency also introduced a new email enquiry service and online centralized complaint form to respond to questions and manage feedback from electors.

As in previous elections, the agency offered a toll-free number through which electors could access automated information or speak to an agent. Elections Canada worked with various partners, such as Service Canada and the Canada Revenue Agency, to ensure that a sufficient number of agents were on-hand to answer calls. When the voice response system was not able to direct the caller to the requested information, a four-tier system was used to further triage and answer more complex queries.

During the 42nd general election the agency received 1,353,700 calls (compared to 1,288,235 for the 41st general election) and 40,600 written communications. Having broadly promoted the enhanced complaints services through all of its communications channels, the agency was fully prepared for any significant increase in the volume of complaints. Elections Canada responded to the 17,200 complaints received during this election more efficiently than the 5,600 received during the 41st general election. Significant service improvements were achieved, with virtually all complaints responded to by March 2016.

Deliver the 2015 General Election

The issue of the writ in the middle of the summer required Elections Canada to launch field deployment earlier than planned. The agency acted quickly to assist returning officers to open 338 local offices and 148 satellite offices. Some offices, however, were delayed in opening, as returning officers were required to revise staffing and delivery plans and, in some cases, renegotiate leases or find new office locations.

As soon as local offices were up and running, returning officers began to serve electors who wished to vote by special ballot. They started validating candidates' nomination papers, oversaw outreach and targeted revision, and hired approximately 285,000 election workers (55,000 more than in 2011). They also hired training officers to deliver the redesigned election worker training program and oversaw the training process for quality assurance.

On election day, returning officers set up 66,026 stationary polls and 1,885 mobile polls. Three quarters (76%) of all Canadians who voted in the election did so on election day. At 68.3%, the voter turnout for the 42nd general election was the highest in 20 years. Electors aged 18 to 24 are those with the steepest turnout increase, and the gap between election day turnout among electors living on First Nations reserves and that of electors in the general population was the smallest observed in recent history.

Following the election, the agency oversaw the closing of local offices, satellite offices and polling sites and the validation of results. The Chief Electoral Officer submitted his official report on the conduct of the election to the Speaker of the House of Commons on February 5, 2016. The Official Voting Results for the 42nd general election were published online on February 29, 2016, followed by the retrospective report on the 42nd general election and the recommendations report, submitted to the Speaker of the House of Commons in the fall of 2016.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
277,113,580 277,113,580 332,356,077 331,586,802 54,473,222*

*The additional expenditures of $54M for 2015–16 are mainly a result of the impact of the 42nd general election's longer election calendar on Elections Canada's operations and the increased voter turnout at the advance polls.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
297 444 147*

*The difference of 147 FTEs mainly results from additional temporary employees for the 42nd general election.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators* Actual Results
The electoral process is accessible and responsive to the needs of electors Percentage of voters who are satisfied with their voting experience According to the Survey of Electors, 96% of electors were satisfied with their voting experience; 81% reported they were "very satisfied" and 15% reported they were "somewhat satisfied."
Percentage of non-voters reporting administrative reasons as their main reason for not voting In the Survey of Electors, 11% of non-voters identified reasons related to the electoral process as the reason for not voting. This result is consistent with results from previous elections.
Elections are delivered whenever they are called Number of days required for all electoral offices to be fully functional For the 2015 general election, 320 of the 338 returning offices (about 95%) were open and operational within eight days. The last one was open and fully operational 15 days after the election call. In the 2011 general election, all returning offices were considered operational within three days of the election call.
Percentage of eligible electors included on the list (coverage**) The final list of electors for the 2015 general election included an estimated 94.5% of eligible electors. This is a one percentage point increase over results from the 2011 general election.
Percentage of electors included on the list and at the correct address (currency/accuracy**) The final list of electors for the 2015 general election had an estimated currency rate of 88.3%, compared to 85.5% for the 2011 general election. It had an estimated accuracy rate of 93.5%, compared to 91.4% in the 2011 general election.
Elections accurately reflect the choices Canadians make Variance between the preliminary and official results (validated or subsequent to judicial recounts) For the 2015 general election, the average variance between preliminary and final results totals for all 338 electoral districts was 0.5570%. In no electoral district did the variance between preliminary and validated voting results affect the outcome of the election. For the 2011 general election, the average variances between preliminary and validated results totals for all 308 electoral districts was 0.3652%.
Number of electoral districts where official election results have been overturned because of administrative errors No election results were overturned.
Canadian electors have opportunities to exercise their right to vote Number of complaints that deal with accessibility of the voting process for people with disabilities Of the 17,200 complaints filed by electors during the 2015 general election, 3,085 (18%) were related to accessibility for people with disabilities. A total of 1,872 complaints related to accessibility for people with disabilities were filed during the 2011 general election (corresponding to 33% of all complaints received).
The redistribution of electoral boundaries is effectively supported Percentage of commissioners who are satisfied with the services and support provided by Elections Canada Not applicable in 2015–16.

*Targets for these performance indicators are under development.

**Coverage is the proportion of eligible electors (Canadian citizens aged 18 and over) who are registered. Currency is the proportion of eligible electors who are registered at their current address. Accuracy is the proportion of registered electors who are listed at their current address.

Program 1.2: Regulation of Electoral Activities

Description

This program provides Canadians with an electoral process that is fair, transparent and in compliance with the Canada Elections Act. Within this program, Elections Canada is responsible for administering the political financing provisions of the Act. This includes compliance monitoring, disclosure and reporting of financial activities.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Finalize Registration of Electoral District Associations

To finalize the implementation of revised electoral district boundaries, Elections Canada completed the registration of new electoral district associations, confirmed existing associations and assisted political entities in deregistering associations that were no longer active. It also revised the lists of electors to align with the new boundaries.

Implement the Electoral Integrity Program

Elections Canada developed and implemented an Electoral Integrity Office to oversee compliance with voting procedures and enhance its ability to detect, analyze and respond to incidents that could affect the integrity of the electoral process.

The agency highlighted the need for vigilance and reporting of unfair campaign practices in its messages to the public and to political entities, and was on alert for any signs of incidents involving, among other things, deceptive communications with electors.

Elections Canada acted quickly on reports of potential risks to electoral integrity. In response to complaints of smudged or pre-marked ballots, it reviewed 28 polls and conducted two post-election studies. It investigated reports of potential double-voting on a case-by-case basis. It reviewed all complaints of misinformation provided to electors by candidates and political parties. All cases involving a potential infringement of the Act were referred to the Commissioner of Canada Elections, or to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, for an independent investigation.

As required by legislation, Elections Canada commissioned an independent audit of poll workers' performance. The audit report concluded that election officials properly exercised their powers and properly performed their duties when it came to regular electors (about 90% of electors). The same could be said for electors subject to special procedures (about 10% of electors). However, for the latter group, administrative procedures such as record-keeping were not always performed consistently. The audit also concluded that training programs and their delivery were effective. The report recommends some improvements going forward, both administrative and legislative.

Align Political Financing Systems with the New Legal Framework

Elections Canada implemented several measures to align with new rules on political financing created by amendments to the Canada Elections Act. It revised its internal systems, political financing manuals for political entities and financial reporting forms, and prepared new financial filing software that was used by candidates to issue contribution receipts and prepare campaign returns.

Following the election, the vast majority of candidates (85%) reported that they had used the political financing handbook; 75% of them found it useful.

Issue Written Opinions, Guidelines and Interpretation Notes

Under new legislative requirements, Elections Canada began issuing written opinions, guidelines and interpretation notes (OGIs) on the application of the Canada Elections Act to political entities in the spring of 2015. The agency's approach was informed by consultations with the Advisory Committee of Political Parties (ACPP) to discuss the new OGI process. The ACPP was pleased with this new program and its implementation.

The agency issued 11 OGIs for the 42nd general election, covering topics such as election advertising on the Internet, candidate and leader debates, and the use of Member of Parliament resources outside an election period. Although the OGI process was a success overall, it would benefit from some adjustments to the legislative framework.

Administer Reimbursements and Subsidies

Following the 42nd general election, 984 candidates and 5 registered parties qualified for a partial reimbursement of their election expenses. Elections Canada began the process of providing reimbursements to qualified eligible candidates and registered political parties, a process that will continue in 2016–17. The agency has also begun sending subsidies to candidate's auditors.

Audit Returns Following the General Election

Using updated audit programs to align with new legislative requirements, Elections Canada began the process of performing compliance audits on the election expenses returns of political entities in February 2016. A total of 1,800 candidates and 23 registered parties will require an audit. This exercise will continue in the 2016–17 fiscal year.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
79,015,382 79,015,382 117,101,533 116,777,324 37,761,942*

*The additional expenditures of $38M for 2015–16 are mainly a result of the impact of the 42nd general election's longer election calendar on reimbursements to candidates and parties.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
59 81 22*

*The difference of 22 FTEs mainly results from additional temporary employees for the 42nd general election.

Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators* Actual Results
Canadians have confidence in the integrity of how the electoral process is managed Percentage of Canadian electors who believe Elections Canada is non-partisan According to the Survey of Electors, most electors (92%) felt that Elections Canada had conducted the election fairly, compared with 90% in 2011.
Percentage of candidates who express confidence in how Elections Canada administers and regulates federal elections According to the Survey of Candidates, just over two thirds of candidates (69%) said they were satisfied with the way the election was administered in their riding, which is consistent with previous results of 72% in 2011 and 68% in 2008.
Canadians have timely access to accurate political financing data Percentage of guidelines and interpretation notes (OGIs) issued within statutory requirements The OGIs were generally issued in accordance with a work plan and timetable agreed upon by representatives of the Advisory Committee of Political Parties. None were subject to statutory timeline requirements.
Political entities understand and comply with their obligations under the Canada Elections Act Proportion of cases that are subject to administrative measures and/or referred to the Commissioner of Canada Elections Result to be reported in 2016–17 as this activity is still underway at the time of publishing this report.
Percentage of candidates who are satisfied with the tools and information provided by Elections Canada

Of the candidates and their agents who attended the agency's "Starting the Campaign" training session, 99% rated it as either "good" or "excellent." Of those who attended the "Closing the Campaign" session, 98% rated it as either "good" or "excellent."

Furthermore, 74% of candidates found the Political Financing Handbook for Candidates and Official Agents to be useful.

*Targets for these performance indicators are under development.

Program 1.3: Electoral Engagement

Description

This program promotes and sustains the Canadian electoral process. It provides Canadians with electoral education and information activities so that they can make informed decisions about their engagement in the electoral process. It also aims to improve the electoral framework by consulting and sharing electoral practices with other stakeholders.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Provide Support to Parliament

The Chief Electoral Officer appeared before the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs on May 7, 2015, to discuss the Main Estimates 2015–16, as well as Bill C-50 An Act to Amend the Canada Elections Act. During his appearance, the Chief Electoral Officer also took the time to inform parliamentarians of Elections Canada's plans for the delivery of the 42nd general election.

The Chief Electoral Officer provided Parliament with insights into the key successes and main challenges for this election in his official report on the conduct of the election, submitted to the Speaker of the House of Commons on February 5, 2016. Further analysis of the lessons learned and the directions recommended to act on these lessons were shared in the retrospective report on the 42nd general election and the report on recommendations for improving Canada's electoral framework. These reports were presented to Parliament in the fall of 2016.

Engage Stakeholders

Leading up to the election, Elections Canada worked closely with stakeholders to ensure that the needs of electors and political participants would be met throughout the election period.

The agency engaged political parties through the Advisory Committee of Political Parties,Footnote 10 convening an annual general meeting in June 2015 and a conference call following the issue of the writs in August. Elections Canada also held a post-election meeting in November 2015 in which members shared feedback on their experiences of the election and the services provided by the agency.

Elections Canada worked with the Advisory Committee of Political Parties to inform its approach on developing OGIs on the application of the Canada Elections Act to political entities. Some members reported that the process helped build bridges and common understanding between Elections Canada and the parties. They particularly appreciated the 30-day pre-consultation period.

The agency consulted with the Elections Canada Advisory BoardFootnote 11 and the Standing Committee on Procedure and House AffairsFootnote 12 on issues such as improvements to the voting process and challenges presented by new legislative requirements.

Elections Canada worked with members of the Advisory Group for Disability IssuesFootnote 13 to not only improve the accessibility of election information, polling sites and voting procedures, but also to disseminate information products to the communities they represent. Through a post-election meeting, the agency collected feedback from the Advisory Group to set an agenda for future improvements.

Finally, the agency engaged with national organizations representing other targeted groups of electors who typically face barriers to voting or who are less aware of the electoral process, such as Aboriginal electors, electors from ethnocultural groups, electors who are homeless, seniors living in long-term care facilities, and youth and students. Local efforts to reach these groups included hiring community relations officers to conduct outreach and 285 Aboriginal Elders and youth to work at polling places.

Communicate with Electors

In the lead up to the 42nd general election, Elections Canada launched a multi-channel communications campaign to inform electors on how to register, options and procedures for voting, identification requirements and key dates in the election calendar.

Using plain language and visual elements, the agency delivered information to electors through multiple channels such as direct mail, news media, social media and an election website, as well as TV, radio, print and digital advertising. Information on where, when and ways to register and vote was also available in alternate formats such as large print, Braille, audio and ASL/LSQ video, and online in 31 heritage languages and 12 Aboriginal languages. A voter information card was sent to approximately 25.8 million electors, followed by a general information brochure mailed to every Canadian household. Campaign messages were also viewed by millions on social media.

Elections Canada's review of the campaign found that it was more effective than the 2011 campaign, with top of mind awareness of Elections Canada as the organization providing information on the voting process at 45% in 2015 versus 30% in the 41st general election. Equally important, the aided recall of the campaign slogan, "Ready to Vote" was at 35% versus 14.5% for the "Vote. Shape your World." slogan in 2011. Post-campaign aided recall of the "Ready to Vote" slogan was highest among students (44%).

Of the electors surveyed post-election, 83% said that their voting information needs had been met. The proportion of non-registered electors surveyed who knew how to register doubled over the course of the campaign.

Promote Civic Education

Elections Canada contracted CIVIX to run the Student Vote parallel election program from October 13 to 16, 2015, in elementary and high schools across the country. Students in grades 4 and up learned about government, candidates, parties and political issues, and then took part in a simulated election, casting mock ballots for federal candidates running in their riding. More than 7,500 schools–approximately half of all Canadian schools–registered to participate in the 2015 federal Student Vote program. A record 922,000 students from 6,662 schools, representing every federal electoral district across Canada, cast a mock ballot. This was a 78% increase from the number of schools and a 64% increase from the number of students who participated in the 2011 Student Vote program.

Public Service Award of Excellence

The recipients of the Public Service Award of Excellence 2016 were announced during National Public Service Week and the agency's Inspire Democracy Program Team was selected as a recipient. The team designed and led a new youth engagement initiative that combined digital and face-to-face interactions to successfully engage youth-serving organizations across Canada in a rich exchange of ideas on electoral participation. Their work had a critical impact on the success of Elections Canada's outreach during the election and supported Canadian youth in exercising their democratic right to vote.

International Assistance and Cooperation

In 2015–16, Elections Canada's international activities were focused on sharing best practices and gaining expertise through relevant forums in order to contribute to and profit from the international body of knowledge on electoral administration. Activity highlights include holding the visitor's program during the 42nd general election, hosting the Working Group on Accountability of Electoral Management Bodies for Voting Integrity,Footnote 14 and participating in electoral networks such as the Réseau des compétences électorales francophonesFootnote 15 and the Commonwealth Electoral Network.Footnote 16

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
8,060,043 8,060,043 8,445,734 8,244,303 184,260


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
62 68 6


Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators* Actual Results
Canadians have the information they need to engage in the electoral process** Canadian electors' recall rate of the Elections Canada advertising campaign

Top of mind awareness of Elections Canada as the organization providing information on the voting process was at 45% in 2015 versus 30% in 2011.

Unaided recall of Elections Canada advertisements or communications about the voting process reached 79% by the end of the campaign period. When respondents were prompted, the voter information card (85%) and general information brochure (60%) had the highest recall, which is consistent with previous elections.

Aided recall of the campaign slogan, "Ready to Vote" was at 35% versus 14.5% for the "Vote. Shape your World." slogan in 2011. Post-campaign aided recall of the "Ready to Vote" slogan was highest among students (44%).

Percentage of Canadian electors using voting options other than polling day voting In total, 24.3% of electors who voted in the 2015 general election used options other than election day voting, up from 16.2% in 2011.
Percentage of Canadian electors who report that they knew when, where and ways to register and vote In a post-election survey, 86% of electors indicated that they were well informed on when to vote; 81% on where to vote; and 73% on the different ways to vote. These indicators were not measured in 2011.
Elections Canada is effective in promoting its civic education program and mobilizing stakeholders to carry out voter education Number of orders for Elections Canada's civic education materials For 2015–16, a total of 13,224 civic education materials orders were processed by the Public Enquiries Unit, which is an increase of more than 50% over the 2014–15 fiscal year. This includes 4,097 election simulation kits, which is an increase of 137% over the previous year.
Number of stakeholders involved in Elections Canada's education activities More than 150 stakeholders were involved in Elections Canada's education activities over the course of 2015–16, including teacher associations, ministries of education, student and youth leadership organizations, civic engagement organizations, provincial electoral management bodies, post-secondary institutions, organizations serving people with disabilities and seniors, Aboriginal organizations, ethnocultural organizations and literacy organizations.
Electoral agencies and international organizations benefit from assistance and cooperation in electoral matters Number of official requests for international assistance to which Elections Canada responds Elections Canada did not receive formal requests for international electoral assistance.
Parliamentarians have timely access to evidence-based information on existing and emerging electoral issues Proportion of recommendations endorsed by the Standing Committee on Procedure and House Affairs Not applicable in 2015–16.

*Targets for these performance indicators are under development.

**Note that Elections Canada established a new baseline evaluation of its multimedia public information campaign during the 42nd general election and therefore not all measures have comparable data from previous elections.

Internal Services

Description

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Program Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned
Support Delivery of the 2015 General Election

Internal services played an essential role in maintaining election readiness and delivering the 42nd general election. Key contributions included:

Amend the Federal Elections Fees Tariff Regulation

The agency proceeded with a successful Treasury Board submission to increase the fees paid to poll workers and other local office staff. Post-election surveys found that 81% of election workers were satisfied with their hourly rate of pay during the 42nd general election, compared to 78% during the 41st general election.

While still meeting its service standard, Elections Canada required more time to pay poll workers in 2015 than in previous general elections. The exceptional duration of the event (78 days) and the large increase in the number of poll workers (55,000 more than in 2011) increased the volume and complexity of pay transactions. The agency is currently working on improving this service for the next general election.

Finalize the 2015 General Election Reporting Framework

Elections Canada finalized the scope and approach for reporting on the conduct of the 42nd general election. Together, the various post-election reports produced by the agency give Canadians a comprehensive and integrated perspective on the 42nd general election, and provide Parliament with evidence-based advice to improve the administration of elections in Canada.

Strengthen Security

In the lead up to the election, Elections Canada continued to implement measures to strengthen security in response to gaps identified in a 2012 audit report. It reinforced governance and accountability for security management as well as controls over financial management and assets. Working with a broad network of public safety and security agencies, including local police services, the agency ensured the safety of electors and workers and the continuity of operations during the election.

Renew Strategic Plan

The agency continued to refine the direction of its strategic planning for 2016–19. It aims to better align the agency's operations with the evolving expectations of Canadian electors and political entities.

Enhance Information Management and Technology

For the 42nd general election, Elections Canada developed and implemented several new information management and technology applications, including online systems for voter registration, voters list revision, public enquiries and complaints management. It deployed geographical information systems, mapping software, and modernized electronic workflows and voter information systems, as well as enhanced reporting and analytics tools. Electors and other stakeholders made use of the new digital tools and services in significant numbers.

Other technical improvements completed during the reporting period included the expansion of the capacity of the agency's data centres, improvements to IT security, the implementation of MyGCHR, and preparatory work for the roll out of the Phoenix pay system.

Manage Human Resources

Throughout the reporting period, the Chief Human Resources Officer Sector continued to support the agency in managing its human resources, particularly in the areas of capacity, staffing, pay, health and safety, official languages and training.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2015–16
Total Authorities
Available for Use
2015–16
Actual Spending (authorities used)
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
31,770,812 31,770,812 30,421,403 29,797,925 (1,972,887)*

*The reduction in Internal Services expenditures of $2M for 2015–16 is mostly due to the focus of the agency on the conduct and evaluation of the 42nd general election.

Human Resources (FTEs)

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned
2015–16
Actual
2015–16
Difference
(actual minus planned)
136 131 (5)