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2012-2013 Report on Plans and Priorities

Future-oriented Financial Statements
Office of the Chief Electoral Officer
For the year ended March 31, 2013

Management Responsibility for Financial Statements

Management of the Office of the Chief Electoral Officer is responsible for this future-oriented financial information, including responsibility for the appropriateness of the assumptions on which this information is prepared.

This information is based on the best information available and assumptions adopted as at December 31, 2011 and reflects the plans described in the Report on Plans and Priorities.

Marc Mayrand
Chief Electoral Officer of Canada

Helen Bélanger, CMA
Chief Financial Officer

Ottawa, Canada
March 14, 2012

Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31
(in thousands of dollars)
  Estimated
Results
2012
Planned
Results
2013
Assets    
Financial assets    
Accountable advances $2  $2 
Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund 19,467 18,316
Receivables    
  - from external parties 440 531
  - from government departments and agencies 546 546
Total financial assets 20,455 19,395
Non-financial assets    
Prepaid expenses 676 676
Consumable supplies 5,587 5,587
Tangible capital assets (Note 7) 13,032 7,644
Total non-financial assets 19,295 13,907
Total $39,750 $33,302
Liabilities    
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities    
- to external parties $16,727 $15,598
- to government departments and agencies 2,033 2,033
Accrued employee salaries and benefits 1,138 1,115
Lease obligation for tangible capital assets (Note 8) 35 8
Provision for vacation leave 1,843 1,879
Deposits from political candidates (Note 14) 115 115
Employee severance benefits (Note 9b) 4,759 4,846
Total liabilities 26,650 25,594
Equity of Canada 13,100 7,708
Total $39,750 $33,302

Information for the year ended March 31, 2012 includes actual amounts from April 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011.
Contractual Obligations (Note 10) and Contingencies (Note 11)
The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

Future-oriented Statement of Operations (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)
  Estimated
Results
2012
Planned
Results
2013
Expenses    
Electoral Operations 208,358 44,473
Regulation of Electoral Activities 104,207 39,732
Electoral Engagement 8,637 10,700
Internal Services 47,211 55,651
Total Expenses 368,413 150,556
Non-tax revenue    
Electoral Engagement 214 25
Internal Services 7 5
Total Non-tax revenue 221 30
Net Cost of Operations $368,192 $150,526

Information for the year ended March 31, 2012 includes actual amounts from April 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011.
Segmented Information (Note 12)
The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.



Future-oriented Statement of Equity of Canada (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)
  Estimated
Results
2012
Planned
Results
2013
Equity of Canada, beginning of year $20,744 $13,100
Net cost of operations (368,192) (150,526)
Change in Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (7,478) (1,150)
Net cash provided by Government 358,558 137,462
Services provided without charge (Note 13) 9,468 8,822
Equity of Canada, end of year $13,100 $7,708

Information for the year ended March 31, 2012 includes actual amounts from April 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011.
The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

Future-oriented Statement of Cash Flow (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31
(in thousands of dollars)
  Estimated
Results
2012
Planned
Results
2013
Operating Activities    
Net cost of operations $368,192 $150,526
Non-Cash items:    
Amortization of tangible capital assets (4,196) (5,388)
Write off of tangible capital assets (1,219) -
Loss on disposal of tangible capital assets (175) -
Services provided without charge (9,468) (8,822)
Variation in Statement of Financial Position:    
(Decrease) increase in accounts receivable and accountable advances (1,253) 91
(Decrease) increase in prepaid expenses (1,198) -
(Decrease) increase in consumable supplies (4,219) -
Decrease in liabilities 10,099 1,028
Cash used in operating activities 356,563 137,435
Capital Investment Activities    
Acquisition of tangible capital assets (excluding capital leases) 1,940 -
Cash used in capital investment activities 1,940 -
Financing Activities    
Payment of capital lease obligations 55 27
Cash used in financing activities 55 27
Net Cash Provided by Government of Canada $358,558 $137,462

Information for the year ended March 31, 2012 includes actual amounts from April 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011.
The accompanying notes form an integral part of these future-oriented financial statements.

Notes to Future-oriented Financial Statements (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2013

  1. Authority and Objectives

    The Office of the Chief Electoral Officer (the Office), commonly known as Elections Canada, is headed by the Chief Electoral Officer who is appointed by resolution of the House of Commons and reports directly to Parliament. The Chief Electoral Officer is completely independent of the federal government and political parties. The Office is named in Schedule I.1 of the Financial Administration Act.

    The Office’s objectives are to enable the Canadian electorate to elect members to the House of Commons in accordance with the Canada Elections Act; to ensure compliance with and enforcement of all provisions of the Canada Elections Act; to calculate the number of members of the House of Commons to be assigned to each province pursuant to the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act and in accordance with the provisions of the Constitution Acts; and to provide the necessary technical, administrative and financial support to the ten electoral boundaries commissions, one for each province, in accordance with the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act.

    The Office is funded by an annual appropriation (which provides for the salaries of permanent, full-time staff) and the statutory authorities contained in the Canada Elections Act, the Referendum Act and the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act. These statutory authorities provide for all other expenditures, including the costs of electoral events, maintenance of the National Register of Electors, quarterly allowances to eligible political parties, redistribution of electoral boundaries and continuing public education programs.

    The Office’s Program Activity Architecture (PAA) contains three program activities and Internal Services. The program activities are:

    1. Electoral Operations

      This program activity allows Elections Canada to deliver fair and efficient electoral events whenever they may be required so that Canadians are able to exercise their democratic right to vote during a federal general election, by-election or referendum by providing an accessible and constantly improved electoral process responsive to the needs of electors.

    2. Regulation of Electoral Activities

      This program activity provides Canadians with an electoral process that is fair, transparent and in compliance with the Canada Elections Act. Within this program activity, Elections Canada is responsible for administering the political financing provisions of the Act. This includes monitoring compliance, disclosure and reporting of financial activities, and enforcing electoral legislation.

    3. Electoral Engagement

      This program activity promotes and sustains the Canadian electoral process. It provides Canadians with electoral education and information programs so that they can make informed decisions about their engagement in the electoral process. It also aims to improve the electoral framework by consulting and sharing electoral practices with other stakeholders.

  2. Methodology and assumptions

    The future-oriented financial statements have been prepared on the basis of the plans of the Office as described in the Report on Plans and Priorities.

    The main assumptions are as follows:

    1. According to the requirement of Treasury Board Accounting Policies, which are based on Canadian Generally Accepted Accounting Principles for the public sector;

    2. Expenses and revenues, including the determination of amounts internal and external to the government, are based on historical experience. The general historical pattern is expected to continue;

    3. Estimated year end information for 2011-2012 is used as the opening position for the 2012-2013 planned results.

    These assumptions are adopted as at December 31, 2011.
  3. Variations and Changes to the Forecast Financial Information

    While every attempt has been made to forecast the final results for the remainder of 2011-2012 and for 2012-2013, actual results achieved for both years are likely to vary from the forecast information presented, and this variation could be material.

    In preparing these future-oriented financial statements the Office has made estimates and assumptions concerning the future. These estimates and assumptions may differ from the subsequent actual results. Estimates and assumptions are continually evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations of future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.

    Factors that could lead to material differences between the future-oriented financial statements and the historical financial statements include:

    1. The timing and amounts of acquisitions and disposals of tangible capital assets may affect gains/losses and amortization expense;

    2. The timing and costs of by-elections, a general election and enhanced event readiness;

    3. Implementation of new collective agreements.

    Once the Report on Plans and Priorities is presented, the Office will not be updating the forecasts for any changes to appropriations or forecast financial information made through supplementary estimates. Variances will be explained in the Departmental Performance Report.

  4. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

    1. Basis of presentation – The future-oriented financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies stated below, which are based on Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector. The presentation and results using the stated accounting policies do not result in any significant differences from Canadian Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, except as disclosed in Note 5 – Net Debt Indicator.

    2. Parliamentary Authorities – The Office operates under two funding authorities: an annual appropriation and statutory authorities. Financial reporting of authorities provided to the Office do not parallel financial reporting according to Canadian Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. They are based in large part on cash flow requirements. Consequently, items recognized in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations and the Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position are not necessarily the same as those provided through authorities from Parliament.

      Note 6 to these Financial Statements provides information regarding the source and disposition of these authorities and provides a high-level reconciliation between the two bases of reporting.

    3. Net cash provided by Government – The Office operates within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by the Office is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements made by the Office are paid from the CRF. The net cash provided by Government is the difference between all cash receipts and all cash disbursements including transactions between departments of the Government.

    4. Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund – Amounts due from the CRF are the result of timing differences at year-end between when a transaction affects authorities and when it is processed through the CRF. Amounts due from the CRF represent the net amount of cash that the Office is entitled to draw from the CRF without further appropriations in order to discharge its liabilities.

    5. Receivables – Receivables are stated at amounts expected to be ultimately realized. A provision is made for receivables where recovery is considered uncertain.

    6. Consumable supplies – Consumable supplies consist mainly of forms and publications used to administer election events and documents distributed to political entities. These supplies are recorded at weighted average cost. The cost is charged to operations in the period in which the items are consumed. If they no longer have service potential, they are valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value.

    7. Tangible capital assets – Tangible capital assets are recorded at historical cost less accumulated amortization. The Office records as tangible capital assets all expenses providing multi-year benefits and leasehold improvements having an initial cost of $5,000 or more. Similar items less than $5,000 are expensed in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations. The Office does not capitalize intangibles. Capital assets acquired for software under development are amortized once that software is put into production.

      Amortization is calculated on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the tangible capital assets as follows:

      Useful Life Cycle of Tangible Capital Assets
      For the Year Ended March 31
      Asset Class Useful Life
      Office equipment 3 to 10 years
      Informatics equipment 3 years
      Software 3 to 5 years
      Furniture and fixtures 10 years
      Vehicles 5 years
      Motorized equipment 10 years
      Leasehold improvements and capital leases Lesser of the remaining term of the lease or estimated useful life

    8. Salaries and benefits, and vacation leave – Salaries and benefits, and vacation leave are expensed as the salary or benefits accrue to the employees under their respective terms of employment. The employee salaries and benefits liability is calculated based on the respective terms of employment using the employees’ salary levels at year end, and the number of days remaining unpaid at the end of the year. The liability for vacation leave is calculated at the salary levels in effect at the end of the year for all unused vacation leave benefits accruing to employees.

    9. Employee future benefits

      1. Pension benefits – Eligible employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, a multiemployer plan administered by the Government of Canada. The Office’s contributions to the Plan are charged to expenses in the year incurred and represent the total of the Office’s obligation to the Plan. Current legislation does not require the Office to make contributions for any actuarial deficiencies of the Plan.

      2. Severance benefits – Employees are entitled to severance benefits under labour contracts or conditions of employment. These benefits are accrued as employees render the services necessary to earn them. The obligation related to the benefits earned by employees is calculated using information derived from the results of the actuarially determined liability for employee severance benefits for the Government as a whole.

    10. Contingent liabilities – Contingent liabilities are potential liabilities, which may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded. If the likelihood is not determinable or an amount cannot be reasonably estimated, the contingency is disclosed in the notes to the Future-oriented Financial Statements.

    11. Services provided without charge – Services provided without charge by other government departments for accommodation, the employer’s contribution to the health and dental insurance plans, audit services and legal services are recorded as operating expenses, at their estimated cost, in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations. A corresponding amount is reported directly in the Future-oriented Statement of Equity of Canada.

    12. Political parties quarterly allowance – The Canada Elections Act allows for the payment from public funds of quarterly allowances to qualifying registered parties. The quarterly allowance is calculated based on the results of the most recent general election preceding the quarter. This allowance is expensed in each quarter of the calendar year as directed by the Act.

    13. Measurement uncertainty – The preparation of these Future-oriented Financial Statements in accordance with Treasury Board accounting policies, which are based on Canadian Generally Accepted Accounting Principles for the public sector, requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses reported in the Future-oriented Financial Statements.

      At the time of preparation of these statements, management believes the estimates and assumptions to be reasonable. The most significant estimates used are contingent liabilities, the liability for employee severance benefits, the useful life of tangible capital assets and candidate and party reimbursement of eligible election expenses. Actual results could significantly differ from those estimated. Management’s estimates are reviewed periodically and, as adjustments become necessary, they are recorded in the Financial Statements in the year they become known.

  5. Net Debt Indicator

    The presentation of the net debt indicator and a statement of change in net debt is required under Canadian Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.

    Net debt is the difference between a government’s liabilities and its financial assets and is meant to provide a measure of the future revenues required to pay for past transactions and events. A statement of change in net debt would show changes during the period in components such as tangible capital assets, prepaid expenses and inventories. Departments are financed by the Government of Canada through appropriations (the Office is also financed through statutory authorities) and operate within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF), which is administered by the Receiver General for Canada. All cash received by departments is deposited to the CRF and all cash disbursements made by departments are paid by the CRF. Under this government business model, assets reflected on the departmental financial statements, with the exception of the Due from the CRF, are not available to use for the purpose of discharging the existing liabilities of the department. Future appropriations and any respendable revenues generated by the department’s operations would be used to discharge existing liabilities.

    Statement of Change in Net Debt
    (in thousands of dollars)
      Estimated
    Results
    2012
    Planned
    Results
    2013
    Liabilities    
    Accounts payable and accrued liabilities $18,760 $17,631
    Accrued employee salaries and benefits 1,138 1,115
    Lease obligation for tangible capital assets (Note 8) 35 8
    Provision for vacation leave 1,843 1,879
    Deposits from political candidates 115 115
    Employee severance benefits (Note 9b) 4,759 4,846
    Total Financial Liabilities 26,650 25,594
    Financial Assets    
    Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund 19,467 18,316
    Accounts receivable and advances 988 1,079
    Total Financial Assets 20,455 19,395
    Net Debt Indicator $6,195 $6,199


  6. Parliamentary Authorities

    The Office receives its funding through an annual Parliamentary authority and the statutory authorities contained in the electoral legislation. Items recognized in the Future-oriented Statement of Operations and the Future-oriented Statement of Financial Position in one year may be funded through Parliamentary authorities in prior, current or future years. Accordingly, the Office has different net results of operations for the year on a government funding basis than on an accrual accounting basis. The differences are reconciled in the following tables:

    a. Authorities requested (in thousands of dollars)
      Estimated
    Results
    2012
    Planned
    Results
    2013
    Authorities requested:    
    Program expenditures - Vote 15 $32,875 $29,501
    Statutory contributions to employee benefit plans 8,031 6,726
    Other statutory expenditures 314,074 99,996
      354,980 136,223
    Less:    
    Forecasted current year lapse - Program expenditures (2,611) -
    Forecasted authorities available $352,369 $136,223


    Authorities presented reflect current forecasts of statutory items, approved initiatives included and expected to be included in Estimates documents and, when reasonable estimates can be made, estimates of amounts to be allocated from Treasury Board central votes.

    b. Reconciliation of Net Cost of Operations to Requested Authorities (in thousands of dollars)
      Estimated
    Results
    2012
    Planned
    Results
    2013
    Net cost of operations $368,192 $150,526
    Adjustments for items affecting net cost of operations but not affecting authorities    
    Add (less):    
    Amortization of tangible capital assets (4,196) (5,388)
    Write off of tangible capital assets (1,219) -
    Consumable supplies (3,806) -
    Services provided without charge by other Government departments (9,468) (8,822)
    Change in employee severance benefits liability 1,953 (87)
    Change in provision for vacation leave (6) (36)
    Loss on disposal of tangible capital assets (175) -
    Non-Tax revenues 221 30
    Other 76 (27)
      351,572 136,196
    Adjustments for items not affecting net cost of operations but affecting authorities    
    Add (less):    
    Acquisition of tangible capital assets (excluding capital leases) 1,940 -
    Payment of capital lease obligations 55 27
    Prepaid expenses (1,198) -
    Forecasted authorities for use $352,369 $136,223


  7. Tangible Capital Assets

    Tangible Capital Assets – Costs
    (in thousands of dollars)
    Capital Asset Class Opening balance Acquisitions Transfers Disposals and write-off Closing balance 2012
    Net book value
    2013
    Net book value
    Office equipment (including capital leases) $1,456 $7 - $66 $1,397 $586 $466
    Informatics equipment 11,533 298 - - 11,831 962 422
    Software 34,529 530 $144 - 35,203 6,810 5,356
    Software under development 3,115 980 -144 1,219 2,732 2,732 356
    Furniture and fixtures 1,851 18 - - 1,869 440 322
    Vehicles and motorized equipment 190 - - - 190 72 60
    Leasehold improvements 5,652 107 - 230 5,529 1,430 662
    Total $58,326 $1,940 - $1,515 $58,751 $13,032 $7,644


    Tangible Capital Assets – Accumulated Amortization
    (in thousands of dollars)
    Capital Asset Class Opening balance Amortization Disposals and write-off Closing balance
    Office equipment (including capital leases) $726 $151 $66 $811
    Informatics equipment 9,812 1,057 - 10,869
    Software 26,587 1,806 - 28,393
    Furniture and fixtures 1,286 143 - 1,429
    Vehicles and motorized equipment 100 18 - 118
    Leasehold improvements 3,133 1,021 55 4,099
    Total $41,644 $4,196 $121 $45,719


  8. Lease Obligation for Tangible Capital Assets

    The Office has entered into agreements to rent office equipment under capital lease with a cost of $306,712 and accumulated amortization of $219,652 as at March 31, 2011. The obligations for the upcoming years include the following:

    Lease Obligation for Tangible Capital Assets
    (in thousands of dollars)
    Maturing year Estimated Results 2012 Planned Results 2013
    2013 $28 -
    2014 4 $4
    2015 3 3
    2016 and thereafter 1 1
    Total future minimum lease payments 36 8
    Less: imputed interest (2.15% to 4.82%) (1) (-)
    Lease obligation for tangible capital assets $35 $8


  9. Employee Future Benefits

    1. Pension benefits

      The Office’s employees participate in the Public Service Pension Plan, which is sponsored and administered by the Government. Pension benefits accrue up to a maximum period of 35 years at a rate of 2 percent per year of pensionable service, times the average of the best five consecutive years of earnings. The benefits are integrated with Canada/Québec Pension plan benefits and they are indexed to inflation.

      Both the employees and the Office contribute to the cost of the Plan. The forecast expenses for the Office are $5,774,289 in 2011-2012 and $4,835,994 in 2012-2013, and representing approximately 2.1 times the contributions of employees.

      The Office’s responsibility with regard to the Plan is limited to its contributions. Actuarial surpluses or deficiencies are recognized in the Financial Statements of the Government of Canada, as the Plan’s sponsor.

    2. Employee Severance Benefits

      The Office provides severance benefits to its employees based on eligibility, years of service and final salary. These severance benefits are not pre-funded. Benefits will be paid from future appropriations. Information about the severance benefits, measured as at March 31 is as follows:

      Employee severance benefits
      (in thousands of dollars)
        Estimated Results 2012 Planned Results 2013
      Accrued benefit obligation, beginning of year $6,712 $4,759
      Expense for the year (1,496) 387
      Benefits paid during the year (457) (300)
      Accrued benefit obligation, end of year $4,759 $4,846


  10. Contractual Obligations

    The nature of the Office’s activities can result in some large multi-year contracts and obligations whereby the Office will be obligated to make future payments when the services will be rendered or goods received. Significant contractual obligations that can be reasonably estimated are summarized as follows:

    Contractual Obligations
    (in thousands of dollars)
    2012 $46,014
    2013 20,482
    2014 3,849
    2015 991
    2016 and thereafter 2,115
    Total $73,451

  11. Contingencies

    Claims have been made against the Office in the normal course of operations. Legal proceedings for claims totalling approximately $1,210,632 were still pending at December 31, 2011. Some of these potential liabilities may become actual liabilities when one or more future events occur or fail to occur. To the extent that the future event is likely to occur or fail to occur, and a reasonable estimate of the loss can be made, an estimated liability is accrued and an expense recorded in the Financial Statements.
  12. Segmented Information

    Presentation by segment is based on the Office program activity architecture. The presentation by segment is based on the same accounting policies as described in the Summary of significant accounting policies in note 4. The following table presents the forecasted expenses incurred and forecasted revenues generated for the main program activities, by major object of expenses and by major type of revenues. The segment results for the period are as follows:

    The main program activities are:

    • PA1: Electoral Operations
    • PA2: Regulation of Electoral Activities
    • PA3: Electoral Engagement


    Forecasted Expenses Incurred and Forecasted Revenues Generated
    (in thousands of dollars)
      2012 2013
      PA1 PA2 PA3 Internal Services Total Total
    Transfer Payments            
    Political parties quarterly allowance   $29,286     $29,286 $23,328
    Reimbursement (adjustment) of candidates’ and parties’ expenses   61,888     61,888 -
    Total Transfer Payments   91,174     91,174 23,328
    Operating Expenses            
    Salaries and benefits 116,409 7,570 6,520 15,944 146,443  51,591
    Professional services 17,854 4,258 1,307 14,019 37,438 34,460
    Travel and communication 27,160 300 137 1,276 28,873 3,518
    Rental of equipment and accommodation 17,930 297 15 8,844 27,086 10,516
    Advertising, publishing and printing 20,948 31 521 200 21,700 4,001
    Repair and maintenance of equipment 2,987 410 44 2,624 6,065 3,654
    Amortization of tangible capital assets 774 - 4 3,418 4,196 5,388
    Utilities, materials and supplies 1,756 46 66 314 2,182 521
    Small equipment 1,060 119 22 131 1,332 9,383
    Write off of Fixed Asset 1,219 - - - 1,219 -
    Land, building and works 237 - - 437 674 4,196
    Interest and other charges 24 2 1 4 31 -
    Total Operating Expenses 208,358 104,207 8,637 47,211 368,413 150,556
    Non-Tax Revenue - 214 - 7 221 30
    Net Cost of Operations $208,358 $103,993 $8,637 $47,204 $368,192 $150,526

  13. Related Party Transactions

    The Office is related as a result of common ownership to all Government of Canada departments, agencies and Crown corporations.

    The Office enters into transactions with these entities in the normal course of business and on normal trade terms.

    Services provided without charge:

    During the year, the Office receives services that are obtained without charge from other government departments and agencies. These services without charge have been recognized in the Office’s Future-oriented Statement of Operations as follows:

    Services Without Charge
    (in thousands of dollars)
      Estimated Results 2012 Planned Results 2013
    Public Works and Government Services Canada – accommodation $5,431 $5,252
    Treasury Board Secretariat – employer’s share of insurance premiums 3,868 3,401
    Office of the Auditor General of Canada – audit services 165 165
    Human Resources and Skills Development Canada – employer’s portion of Worker’s compensation payments 4 4
    Total Services provided without charge $9,468 $8,822


    The Government has centralized some of its administrative activities for efficiency, cost-effectiveness purposes and economic delivery of programs to the public. As a result, the Government uses central agencies and common service organizations so that one department performs services for all other departments and agencies without charge. The cost of these services, such as cheque issuance services provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada are not included in the Office’s Future-oriented Statement of Operations.

  14. Deposits from Political Candidates

    The Deposits from political candidates represent the Office’s outstanding liability in relation to nomination deposits. Once the CEO is satisfied that the candidates have filed a complete electoral campaign return and that the unused receipts valid for income tax purposes supplied by the returning officer have been returned within one month after polling day, these deposits are refunded.