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Voter Qualification Mailing

Voter Registration Mailing

On January 6, 2021, Elections Canada sent a letter asking individuals to confirm that they are qualified to vote. This letter was sent to help ensure the accuracy of the National Register of Electors.

To be qualified to register and vote in a federal election, you must meet two criteria:

  • be at least 18 years old on election day and
  • have Canadian citizenship

Most Canadian citizens who are qualified to vote are already included in the National Register of Electors (the Register), which is used to create the lists of electors for federal elections and referendums.

For more information, read the FAQs below or contact us.

FAQs about the Voter Qualification Mailing

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Q1: Why did I receive a letter from Elections Canada?

You received a letter because we need to confirm your registration as a qualified elector in the National Register of Electors.

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Q2: I'm not a Canadian citizen and/or at least 18 years old. Why did I receive this letter and what should I do with it?

You received a letter because we need to confirm your registration as a qualified elector in the National Register of Electors. If you are not a Canadian citizen and/or at least 18 years old, you do not need to respond to the letter. Your name will be removed from the Register. If you meet the qualification criteria in the future, you will be able to register to vote at that time.

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Q3: What is the purpose of the qualification letter?

This letter is sent as part of Elections Canada's ongoing efforts to maintain an accurate National Register of Electors (the Register). It asks recipients to confirm that they are qualified to vote in federal elections and referendums. To be qualified to vote, electors must be at least 18 years old on election day and have Canadian citizenship. They must meet both criteria to register and vote in federal elections.

If you meet both criteria, you must complete and send back the detachable Response Form on the bottom of the letter by March 10, 2021.

If you do not meet both criteria, you do not need to return the form. Your name will be removed from the Register.

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Q4: What is the National Register of Electors?

The National Register of Electors (the Register) is a database of Canadian citizens who are at least 18 years old and qualified to vote in federal elections and referendums. It contains basic information about each elector—name, address, gender and date of birth.

The information in the Register is used to create lists of electors during federal elections, by-elections and referendums. It may also be shared with provincial, territorial, and some municipal electoral agencies that have signed agreements with Elections Canada, as permitted by the Canada Elections Act. Canadians may choose whether or not to have their information included in the Register or shared with electoral agencies.

Elections Canada takes precautions to ensure that the information in the Register is kept secure and used for authorized purposes only.

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Q5: Where did you get my information?

We receive information from a variety of sources, including:

  • the Canada Revenue Agency (for those who consented on their income tax return to share their information with us by checking the Elections Canada boxes);
  • Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (for new citizens who consented on their application package);
  • provincial/territorial driver's licence bureaus;
  • electoral agencies;
  • voter registrations or registration updates.

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Q6: How are names added to the National Register of Electors?

Elections Canada receives information from a variety of sources, including:

  • the Canada Revenue Agency (for those who consented on their income tax return to share their information with us by checking the Elections Canada boxes);
  • Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (for new citizens who consented on their application package);
  • provincial/territorial driver's licence bureaus;
  • electoral agencies;
  • voter registrations or registration updates.

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Q7: Is my information in the National Register of Electors kept confidential?

Yes. The privacy of all information in the National Register of Electors (the Register) is protected by the Canada Elections Act and the Privacy Act. Elections Canada takes precautions to make sure that the information in the Register is kept secure and used for authorized purposes only.

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Q8: I already meet both qualification criteria. Why did I receive this letter?

You received a qualification letter because we need to confirm your information in the National Register of Electors.

If you have Canadian citizenship (either by birth or naturalization) and are at least 18 years old, you must complete and return the detachable Response Form in the envelope provided by March 10, 2021, in order to certify that you meet both qualification criteria.

Please note that it is illegal under the Canada Elections Act to knowingly make false statements about your qualification to vote, and those convicted of doing so may face penalties.

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Q9: Do I need to prove my Canadian citizenship?

No. If you have Canadian citizenship and are at least 18 years old, you only need to complete and return the detachable Response Form by March 10, 2021. This will be considered an official confirmation that you meet both qualification criteria.

Please note that it is illegal under the Canada Elections Act to knowingly make false statements about your qualification to vote, and those convicted of doing so may face penalties.

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Q10: I received this letter and I'm a permanent resident. Am I allowed to vote?

No. To be qualified to vote, electors must be at least 18 years old on election day and have Canadian citizenship.

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Q11: What will you do when you receive my Response Form?

We will use your Response Form to confirm your voter registration in the National Register of Electors.

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Q12: What if I missed the deadline?

By law, the Chief Electoral Officer is authorized to remove a name from the National Register of Electors (the Register).

Once your name is removed from the Register, you will need to register again in order to vote, if you meet both qualification criteria. Please note that it is illegal under the Canada Elections Act to knowingly make false statements about your qualification to vote, and those convicted of doing so may face penalties.

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Q13: What if I lose the letter or my detachable Response Form?

If you lose the letter or your detachable Response Form, please contact us.

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Q14: I now live at a different address than the one printed on the letter? What should I do?

If you are a qualified elector, first make sure to return the detachable Response Form before the deadline. You may update your address using our Online Voter Registration Service, or we can send you an Update Request form to complete, sign and return to Elections Canada with photocopies of the required identification documents. A return envelope will be provided for your convenience.

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Q15: I have legally changed my name, and my new name does not appear on the letter. What should I do?

If you are a qualified elector, first make sure to return the detachable Response Form before the deadline. To change your name, contact us. We can send you an Update Request form to complete, sign and return to Elections Canada with photocopies of the required identification documents. A return envelope will be provided for your convenience.

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Q16: Why did I receive a letter from the National Register of Electors but my ____ did not?

You received a letter because we need to confirm your registration as a qualified elector in the National Register of Electors.

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Q17: I received a letter for a person who does not live here. What should I do with it?

If you have received someone else's mail, you can write "Moved" or "Unknown" on the envelope and put it in a mailbox. The envelope will then be returned to Elections Canada, and we will take the appropriate action.

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Q18: I received a letter for someone who is deceased. Why? What should I do with the letter?

If you received a letter intended for a person who has passed away, you don't need to do anything. Elections Canada has agreements to regularly receive files that include the names of people over the age of 18 whose deaths have been registered. Once received, this information is matched against the Register, and the names of electors who are confirmed to be deceased are removed from the Register.

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Q19: What is a TTY service?

TTY is a special device that lets people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or speech-impaired to use the telephone to communicate by allowing them to type messages back and forth to one another instead of talking and listening. A TTY is required at both ends of the conversation in order to communicate. Elections Canada's TTY service line is 1-800-361-8935.

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Privacy notice

Your personal information is collected to maintain the National Register of Electors (the "Register") in accordance with the Canada Elections Act (Act). Personal information is used to register you as an elector or to update your information and determine the electoral district in which your vote will be counted. Personal information contained in the Register, excluding date of birth, is used for preparing lists of electors that are shared with members of Parliament, political parties and candidates for uses authorized by the Act. Register information may be disclosed to provincial and territorial electoral agencies and municipalities in accordance with information-sharing agreements authorized under the Act. Register information may also be shared with the Commissioner of Canada Elections to ensure the Act is complied with and enforced.

Inclusion in the Register is optional. If you wish to be removed from the Register, or to prevent the sharing of your personal information with provincial and territorial electoral agencies and municipalities, you may make such a request in writing to Elections Canada. If your information is not in the Register, you will not receive a voter information card during an election period to inform you of where to vote, and you will not automatically be included on the lists of electors. You will still be able to vote; however, you will have to register at any local Elections Canada office, at the advance polls or at your assigned polling station on election day. At that time, you can indicate on your registration form that you do not wish to be added to the Register.

You have the right of access to, correction and protection of your personal information under the Privacy Act. You also have the right to file a complaint with the Privacy Commissioner of Canada regarding the handling of your personal information. Your personal information is retained under the personal information bank number (PIB) Elections PPU 037. A 'a href="/content.aspx?section=abo&dir=atip/info&document=p8&lang=e#Voter_Registration_(PIB)">description of the PIB can be found at elections.ca.