Federal Election
Monday, October 21

FAQs on registration

Do I have to register to vote?

Yes. There are many ways to register, including registering when you go to vote.

Canadians who are registered in advance should get a voter information card in the mail by October 3. It tells you where and when you can vote.

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Am I registered to vote?

Most Canadians who are eligible to vote are registered.

To check if you’re registered or to make sure you’re registered at your current address, use the Online Voter Registration Service or call us.

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How do I register to vote?

There are many ways to register to vote.

1. Online

Use the Online Voter Registration Service to register before Tuesday, October 15, 6 p.m. You must prove your identity and address to register. Visit ID to vote for the full list of accepted ID.

2. In person

  • You can register and vote at any Elections Canada office across Canada before Tuesday October 15, 6 p.m.
    or
  • You can register at your assigned polling station when you go to vote on advance polling days, or on election day, Monday, October 21.

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How do I update my voter information?

You can update your voter information using the Online Voter Registration Service or at any Elections Canada office across Canada before Tuesday, October 15, 6 p.m.

Otherwise, update your voter information at your assigned polling station before you vote on advance polling days, or on election day, Monday, October 21.

To change your name or make other kinds of registration updates, contact the Elections Canada office in your riding as soon as possible, but before Tuesday, October 15, at 6 p.m.

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I recently moved. Can I still vote?

Yes. Simply update your address using the Online Voter Registration Service or at any Elections Canada office across Canada until Tuesday, October 15, 6 p.m.

You can also update your address at your assigned polling station before you vote on advance polling days, or on election day, Monday, October 21.

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I live in more than one place. Which address do I use to register?

If you live in more than one place throughout the year, register using whichever address you consider your home. This is the place where you ordinarily live, where you think of as home or have adopted as home. Remember that you will vote for a candidate in the riding where you’re registered to vote.

Keep in mind:

  • If you want to vote on election day or during advance polling days, you need to be in your riding. If you’re away from home on those days, you’ll need to vote before election day at any Elections Canada office across Canada or by mail. Deadlines apply.
  • When you vote, you must prove your identity and address – make sure you bring ID to vote.

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If I register online, what types of ID are accepted?

If you register online:

  • You may be requested to provide the number on your driver's licence (from any province or territory except Quebec), or your provincial or territorial ID card (from Alberta, Newfoundland and Labrador, Saskatchewan or Yukon).
    or
  • You could be offered the option to use the Online Document Submission feature of the Online Voter Registration Service, consult the list of accepted ID to find out which documents can be included with your application.

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Why do I have to indicate my gender when I register?

We currently collect gender identity at registration only because the law requires us to. We report the gender of electors in the National Register of Electors and on the lists of electors we use at the polls.

Once you’re registered, you do not need to show ID that indicates your gender when you vote. Your gender identity or gender expression does not affect your right to vote.

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I’m having trouble with the Online Voter Registration Service. What’s going on?

There are a few reasons why you may have trouble using the online service. Here are some simple solutions.

You recently moved

If you recently moved, you might still be registered at your previous address. In this case, you may see the message “Double-check your address.”

Follow these steps to update your address:

  • Click on “Go back to the Enter information screen” and enter your old address. Once the service finds you, it will say you are registered and give you this message: “Need to update your address?”
  • Click on “Update your home or mailing address here” to enter your new address.

You need to re-enter your address

If you made a mistake or entered information in the wrong field, you may see the message “Double-check your address.” Simply click on “Go back to the Enter information screen” to review and resubmit your information.

You changed your name

If you changed your name, the service may not be up to date with your new name.

You can update your name at your assigned polling station when you go vote on advance polling days, or on election day, Monday, October 21. You can also visit any Elections Canada office across Canada before Tuesday, October 15, 6 p.m.

You have never registered before

To register online you need to provide proof of identity and address.

  • You may be asked for the number on your driver’s licence (from any province or territory except Quebec), or your provincial or territorial ID card (from Alberta, Newfoundland and Labrador, Saskatchewan or Yukon)
    or
  • You could be offered the option to use the online document submission feature of the Online Voter Registration Service.

You can also register at any Elections Canada office across Canada until Tuesday, October 15, 6 p.m.

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What is the National Register of Electors?

The National Register of Electors is a database of Canadians aged 18 and older who are eligible to vote in federal elections and referendums. Elections Canada keeps the register up to date using federal, provincial and territorial electoral data sources. We use the National Register of Electors to create lists of electors (commonly called the “voters list”) that contain the names of all Canadians registered to vote in a given geographical area. When you vote at the polls, these are the lists you see election workers using when you check in.

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Can I remove my name from the National Register of Electors and still vote?

Canadians who are eligible to vote may choose whether or not to be included in the Register. Being in the Register has several benefits—you don’t have to register at every election, and you will be sent a voter information card telling you where and when you can to vote after the election is called. If you decide to opt out of the Register, you will lose these benefits, but not your right to vote. To request to be removed from the Register, call us at 1-800-463-6868.

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Do you share voter information with anyone?

Yes. We share voter information from the National Register of Electors with most provincial and territorial elections agencies and with some municipalities for election purposes only. Sharing voter information between electoral jurisdictions improves the accuracy of lists of electors, making it easier to vote. It also reduces duplication, saving taxpayer money.

As required by the Canada Elections Act, we also provide lists of electors (which contain your name, address and unique identifier number) to political candidates, members of Parliament and registered political parties who may use the information for specific, authorized purposes. Refer to the Guidelines on Use of the Lists of Electors to learn more.

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My loved one passed away. How do I remove their name from the list of electors?

To remove the name of a deceased person, contact Elections Canada. We will walk you through the steps.

Elections Canada receives notices of deaths from most provincial and territorial vital statistics agencies, the Canada Revenue Agency, and provincial elections agencies with permanent lists of electors. We use this information to remove the names of the deceased from federal lists of electors.

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If I use the online registration service on a public computer, should I take extra steps to protect my privacy?

Yes. If you use the service in a public place like a library, take these steps:

  • delete any outstanding print jobs
  • do not save any filled PDF forms
  • clear the web browser cache and close the web browser when you are done using the computer (see instructions below)

Your web browser is the computer program that lets you see web pages. Some popular browsers are Internet Explorer, Safari, Firefox and Chrome. Browsers have a "cache," a temporary storage area that tracks information on the web pages you visit. To maintain your privacy on a public computer, clear the browser's cache after each session.

How to clear your web browser cache – instructions for different browsers

  • In Firefox, go to Tools > Clear Recent History.
  • In Internet Explorer, go to Tools > Delete Browsing History.
  • In Chrome, click on the wrench icon in the top right-hand corner. Go to Bonnet > Clear Browsing Data.
  • In Safari, go to Safari > Empty Cache > Empty.

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