Federal Election
Monday, October 21

FAQs on registration

Do I have to register to vote?

Yes. You can still register or update your voter information, including your name, at your assigned polling station before you vote on election day, Monday, October 21.

If you registered before October 15, 6 p.m., you should have received a voter information card in the mail. It tells you where and when you can vote.

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Am I registered to vote?

Most Canadians who are eligible to vote are already registered in the National Register of Electors. If you are registered and you checked off both Elections Canada boxes on your tax return this year, your registration will be updated with your current home address.

To check if you're registered at your current address, use the Online Voter Registration Service or contact your local Elections Canada office.

You can also register or update your voter information, including your name, at your assigned polling station before you vote on election day, Monday, October 21.

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How do I register to vote?

You can register or update your voter information, including your name, at your assigned polling station before you vote on election day, Monday, October 21.

You can also use the Online Voter Registration Service to print a registration certificate, if:

  • you are not yet registered; or
  • your information needs to be updated.

This certificate is not required to register in person at the polls and is offered only if the service can associate your address with a polling division (within a riding).

You should bring a printed copy of the registration certificate, and sign it only at your polling station, in front of the poll worker who is processing your registration.

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How do I update my voter information?

You can update your voter information at your assigned polling station before you vote on election day, on Monday, October 21.

You can also use the Online Voter Registration Service to print a registration certificate, if:

  • you are not yet registered; or
  • your information needs to be updated.

This certificate is not required to register in person at the polls and is offered only if the service can associate your address with a polling division (within a riding).

You should bring a printed copy of the registration certificate, and sign it only at your polling station, in front of the poll worker who is processing your registration.

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I recently moved. Can I still vote?

Yes. You can update your address at your assigned polling station before you vote on election day, Monday, October 21.

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I live in more than one place. Which address do I use to register?

If you live in more than one place throughout the year, register using whichever address you consider your home. This is the place where you ordinarily live, where you think of as home or have adopted as home. Remember that you will vote for a candidate in the riding where you're registered to vote.

To vote on election day, you need to be in your riding. When you vote, you must prove your identity and address – make sure you bring ID to vote.

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What if I don't have a driver's licence or provincial/territorial ID card?

If you are confirming your registration, you do not require a driver's licence or provincial/territorial ID card. You can still show ID from this list to register at your assigned polling station before you vote on election day, Monday, October 21.

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Why do I have to indicate my gender when I register?

We currently collect gender identity at registration only because the law requires us to. We report the gender of electors in the National Register of Electors and on the lists of electors we use at the polls.

Once you're registered, you do not need to show ID that indicates your gender when you vote. Your gender identity or gender expression does not affect your right to vote.

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What is the National Register of Electors?

The National Register of Electors is a database of Canadians aged 18 and older who are eligible to vote in federal elections and referendums. Elections Canada keeps the Register up to date using federal, provincial and territorial administrative and electoral data sources. We use the Register to create lists of electors (commonly called the “voters list”) that contain the names of all Canadians registered to vote in a given geographical area. When you vote at the polls, these are the lists you see election workers using when you check in.

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Can I remove my name from the National Register of Electors and still vote?

Canadians who are eligible to vote may choose whether or not to be included in the Register. Being in the Register has several benefits—you don't have to register at every election, and you will be sent a voter information card telling you where and when you can to vote after the election is called. If you decide to opt out of the Register, you will lose these benefits, but not your right to vote. To request to be removed from the Register, call us at 1-800-463-6868.

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What is a voters list (list of electors)?

A voters list (list of electors) shows all of the people who are registered to vote in a particular polling division (area within a riding). Voters lists are based on information in the National Register of Electors, the permanent database of Canadians aged 18 and older who are qualified to vote in a federal election.

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Do you share voter information with anyone?

Yes. We share voter information from the National Register of Electors with all provincial and territorial elections agencies and with some municipalities for election purposes only. Sharing voter information between electoral jurisdictions improves the accuracy of lists of electors, making it easier to vote. It also reduces duplication, saving taxpayer money.

As required by the Canada Elections Act, we also provide lists of electors (which contain your name, address and unique identifier number) to political candidates, members of Parliament, registered political parties who may use the information for specific, authorized purposes. Refer to the Guidelines on Use of the Lists of Electors to learn more.

Note that we do note share voter information with any other organizations, including social media platforms and media.

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My loved one passed away. How do I remove their name from the list of electors?

To remove the name of a deceased person, contact Elections Canada. We will walk you through the steps.

Elections Canada receives notices of deaths from most provincial and territorial vital statistics agencies, the Canada Revenue Agency, and provincial elections agencies with permanent lists of electors. We use this information to remove the names of the deceased from federal lists of electors.

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If I use the Online Voter Registration Service on a public computer, should I take extra steps to protect my privacy?

Yes. If you use the service in a public place like a library, take these steps:

  • delete any outstanding print jobs
  • do not save any filled PDF forms
  • clear the web browser cache and close the web browser when you are done using the computer (see instructions below)

Your web browser is the computer program that lets you see web pages. Some popular browsers are Internet Explorer, Safari, Firefox and Chrome. Browsers have a "cache," a temporary storage area that tracks information on the web pages you visit. To maintain your privacy on a public computer, clear the browser's cache after each session.

How to clear your web browser cache – instructions for different browsers

  • In Firefox, go to Tools > Clear Recent History.
  • In Internet Explorer, go to Tools > Delete Browsing History.
  • In Chrome, click on the wrench icon in the top right-hand corner. Go to Bonnet > Clear Browsing Data.
  • In Safari, go to Safari > Empty Cache > Empty.

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